Mathematics/Computer Science Virginia Wesleyan College
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MATH/CS

FACULTY

Mrs. Kathy R. Ames (Visiting Instructor of Math/CS)
Dr. Lydia Kennedy
Dr. J. Patrick Lang (Adjunct)
Dr. Margaret Reese
Dr. Z. John Wang
Ms. Denise M. Pocta Wilkinson, Department Coordinator

Mathematics is both a science and an art that has fascinated mankind for centuries and forms the foundations of many of the other modern sciences. With the technological advances of recent years, computer science, statistics, and other applied mathematical sciences have achieved a status that rivals that of classical mathematics itself.

The College has a broad range of courses designed to enhance the mathematical awareness, abilities, and appreciation of the student body in general, including a substantial selection of service courses for liberal arts students who wish to strengthen their mathematical or computer-programming skills but have no desire to continue beyond the lowest levels. In addition, the department offers a wide variety of specific courses aimed at supporting the pursuit of knowledge in such diverse fields as biology, chemistry, physics, sociology, psychology, and management. Mathematics courses numbered 170-205 may be taken by any student with a strong high school background or a successful record in MATH 135. All mathematics courses above 226 require MATH 172. Computer science courses numbered 200–299 may be taken by any student with a strong high school background.

The Mathematics and Computer Science Department offers two majors: Mathematics and Computer Science.

The curriculum for majors imparts in students a solid foundation in the fundamentals of both mathematics and computer science. Graduates of the program are well-situated for study at the graduate level or for careers in one of the increasingly lucrative and challenging computer-related applied mathematics fields. Additionally, some students, studying jointly in the education and mathematics departments, prepare themselves for employment as educators.

Major Requirements

Minor Requirements

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (CS)

100 Computer Concepts and Applications (3)
In this survey of computer concepts and applications, topics include the historical development and future of the computer, applications software including word processors, spreadsheets, database, and presentation software; web page development and programming using HTML; and the social concerns that have arisen with the widespread use of the computer. Prerequisite: MATH 105 placement or consent. Offered each semester.

110 Introduction to Programming with Visual BASIC (3)
The Visual BASIC programming language is used in this introductory programming course. Topics include the program development process, structured programming, data types, assignment, selection, looping, subroutines, one-dimension arrays, files, and random numbers. This course does not count toward a degree in mathematics nor in computer science/mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 105 (grade of C- or better) or placement. Offered on demand.

112 Computer Programming I (3)
The C++ language is introduced and used for all programs. Topics include the program development process, structured programming, data types, assignment, selection, looping, functions, files, arrays, and structures. Prerequisite: MATH 105 (grade of C or better), placement, or consent; Offered each fall.

202 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming and Java (3)
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) with Java. Topics include OOP concepts, data types, syntax, control/loop structures and objects. Students will use OOP to solve practical problems and develop the potential to learn other OOP languages. Prerequisite: MATH 135 or consent. Offered each spring.

205 Discrete Mathematics (3)
Identical to MATH 205.

212 Computer Programming II (3)
A continuation of CS 112, topics include advanced programming design in user-defined data types, arrays, structures, pointers, array-based lists, binary searching, recursion, and introduction to object-oriented programming techniques. Prerequisite: CS 112 or consent. Offered each spring.

310 Introduction to Computer Systems (3)
The basic concepts of computer organization and assembly language are introduced. Specific topics include cpu and memory organization, machine language, addressing techniques, macros, program segmentation and linkage, and assembler construction. Prerequisites: CS 202 or CS 212 or consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

311 Data Structures (3)
An introduction to commonly used computer data structuring techniques. Topics include abstract data types, classes, queues, stacks, linked lists, algorithm analysis, sorting, searching, tree and graph. Prerequisites: CS 212 or consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

331 Systems Analysis and Design (3)
Introduces the concepts, principles, and stages of computer-based information systems analysis and design. Topics include the system development environment, project management, system requirements definition, interface and structure design, and system implementation and administration. Prerequisite: CS 212 or consent. Offered on demand.

332 Data Communications and Networks (3)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, technologies, and applications of computer networks. Topics include the basics of data communications, network topologies, protocols, routing and switching, naming and addressing, and network operations. Prerequisite: CS 212 or consent. Offered on demand.

350 Numerical Methods (3)
Identical to MATH 350.

380 Programming Languages (3)
Beginning with a study of the historical development of programming languages, students are introduced to the decisions involved in the design and implementation of such programming language features as elementary, structured, and user-defined data types, subprograms, sequence control, data control and storage management. Selected features of several existing languages are examined in the context of these issues. Prerequisites: CS 202 and CS 212, or consent. Offered on demand.

411 Introduction to Algorithms (3)
Introduces the fundamental computer algorithms, their performance analysis and the basic techniques to design algorithms. Topics include the standard algorithms and performance analysis for search and sorting, advanced data structures, graph theory, and algebraic computations. Students will have the capability to design algorithms for solving various computational problems. Prerequisite: CS 311 and MATH 171, or consent. Offered on demand.

430 Database Management Systems Design (3)
Emphasizes the concepts and structures necessary to design and implement database systems using a relational database management system. Various database management system architectures, illustrating hierarchical, network, and relational models are discussed. Physical data storage techniques, file security, data integrity, and data normalization are also explored. Prerequisite: CS 202 or CS 212 or consent. Offered on demand.

440 Operating Systems (3)
The principles of operating systems are introduced with an emphasis on intra-system communication. The concepts and techniques necessary for understanding and designing these systems are examined. Topics include I/O and interrupt structure, concurrent processes, process scheduling, and memory management and protection. Prerequisite: CS 202 or CS 212 or consent. CS 310 is recommended. Offered on demand.

480 Advanced Topics in Computer Science (3)
An in-depth study of an area of advanced computer science. The specific content varies according to the interests of the students and the instructor. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisites: CS 202 or CS 212, and consent. Offered on demand.

489 Research in the Natural or Mathematical Sciences (3)
Provides students with the opportunity to conduct original research in an area of interest. Students work closely with one or more members of the faculty to develop and conduct a research project. Students present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. They are encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisite: jr/sr status and a major in computer science, prior approval by the project adviser, and consent of the instructor. May be repeated once for a total of six semester hours of credit. Identical to BIO 489, CHEM 489, EES 489, and MATH 489. Offered each semester.

MATHEMATICS COURSES (MATH)

001 Computational Math (0)*
Basic arithmetic computational skills are developed in this non-credit class that allows students to strengthen their understanding of fundamentals in preparation for the course Algebraic Preliminaries. In particular, students with very low mathematics placement scores must complete this course with a grade of C or better before attempting MATH 005. Topics include: operations with fractions, decimals (with calculators), ratio and proportion, percents, metric system, statistics, geometry, operations on whole and signed numbers, and algebraic translations.

* While students receive no credit from this course, the course grade does count toward their overall grade point average (as if this were a three-semester hour course). Offered each fall.

005 Algebraic Preliminaries (0)*
Basic computational and algebraic skills are developed in this non-credit class that allows students to strengthen their understanding of fundamentals in preparation for courses that involve more difficult quantitative concepts. In particular, students with very low mathematics placement scores must complete this course with a grade of C or better before attempting MATH 105. Topics include: operations on whole and signed numbers, fractions, decimals, exponents, variables, linear equations, and elementary problem solving.

* While students receive no credit from this course, the course grade does count toward their overall grade point average (as if this were a three-semester-hour course). Prerequisite: MATH 001 (grade of C- or better), placement or consent. Offered each semester.

104 Algebra and its Applications (3)
Constructed to provide a choice for students who must fulfill the general studies requirement for math but do not need an in-depth treatment of algebra as a prerequisite for further course work such as might be encountered in MATH 135. This course introduces students to modern and pertinent applications of algebra and other mathematical processes. While the emphasis in content is on the utility of algebra instead of algebra itself, an understanding of and skill with the rudiments of algebraic techniques is a prerequisite. Topics include percentages and ratios, functions and graphs, linear and quadratic functions, descriptive statistics and probability, exponentials and logarithms, and right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 005 (grade of C- or better), placement or consent. Not a prerequisite for Math 135. Must have a TI-82 or TI-83 graphing calculator. Offered each semester.

105 Algebra (3)
Prepares students for any course which uses algebra. Topics include variables, word problems, exponents, factoring, rational and radical expressions, linear equations in one or two variables, quadratic expressions, and functions. Prerequisites: MATH 005 (grade of C- or better), placement or consent. Offered each semester.

106 Statistics (3)
Introduces students in the behavioral, social, and natural sciences to the basic statistical tools required to analyze experimental data. Topics include frequency distributions, graphing techniques, percentiles, measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal distribution, point estimation, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. Prerequisites: MATH 104 or MATH 105, placement, or consent. Offered each spring.

125 Mathematics in Western Culture (3)
Traces the development of mathematics in Western culture, beginning with Greek Geometry through recent applications such as cryptography and fractal geometry. Topics include the nature of mathematical knowledge, history of mathematics, geometry, elementary number theory and basic trigonometry. Prerequisites: Math 135 placement or MATH 105 (grade C- or better). Offered each spring.

135-136 Calculus with Review I and II (3+3)
These courses together are equivalent to Calculus I (Math 171) with the addition of careful treatments of algebra and trigonometry as the need for them arises within the development of the calculus. Prerequisites of MATH 135: MATH 105 (grade of C- or better), placement or consent. Prerequisites of MATH 136: MATH 135, placement or consent. MATH 135 is offered every semester, and MATH 136 is offered every Spring.

171 Calculus I (3)
Develops the differential calculus of the elementary functions with associated analytic geometry. Included are the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and applications of differentiation in the sciences. Prerequisites: placement, or consent. Offered each fall.

172 Calculus II (3)
Develops, starting with the Fundamental Theorem, the integral calculus of elementary and transcendental functions, techniques of integration and applications of integration. Prerequisite: MATH 136, or MATH 171 or placement. Offered each spring.

205 Discrete Mathematics (3)
In this introduction to non-continuous mathematics, elementary logic, algorithm development, linear inequalities, linear programming, matrices, combinatorics, and discrete probability are covered. Prerequisites: MATH 135, MATH 171 placement, or consent. Offered each spring.

226 Introduction to Statistical Modeling (3)
An introductory course in applied data analysis. Emphasis will be on interpretation of statistical measures and procedures. Statistical software will be used extensively for analyzing real data sets from various contexts. Topics include measures of location, dispersion, and correlation, parametric and nonparametric tests, simple and multiple regression, and ANOVA. Prerequisites: MATH 135 or Math 106 or consent. Offered every Spring.

271 Calculus III (3)
Finishes the topics typically included in a thorough treatment of single variable calculus. Those topics include elements of differential equations, introduction to sequences and series, Taylor polynomials and series, and power series representations. Other topics may include Fourier series and dynamical systems. Prerequisites: MATH 172. Offered each fall.

300 Teaching Assistants’ Program for Math (1 or 2)
Designed to allow qualified students to assist math instructors in the teaching of their classes. Although MATH 300 will prove to be useful for those students seeking secondary education certification, enrollment is not open solely to them. Enrollment is by invitation of the MATH/CS department. A student may enroll for MATH 300 more than once, but may apply no more than a total of three semester hours earned in this manner toward graduation. This course cannot be used to satisfy mathematics or computer science/mathematics major or minor requirements although one semester hour of MATH 300 is required for secondary education. Offered each semester.

303 Multivariable Calculus (3)
Topics include functions of several variables, curves, surfaces, partial differentiation, multiple integrals and vector analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 172. Offered each spring of even-numbered years.

307 Linear Algebra (3)
Topics include systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear dependence, bases, dimension, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, quadratic form, orthogonal reduction to diagonal form, eigenvalues, and geometric applications. Prerequisite: MATH 172, MATH/CS 205 or consent. Offered each fall.

315 Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
Explores the theory and applications of ordinary differential equations and their solutions. Topics include linear and non-linear first order equations, higher order linear equations, series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, Laplace transforms and numerical methods. Prerequisites/co-requisite: Math 271 and 307. Offered on demand.

316 Probability (3)
The meaning, basic concepts, and applications of probability are explored in this course. Topics include classical, empirical, subjective, and axiomatic probability, random variables, probability measures, distributions, density functions, expectation and standard deviation and their physical interpretation, conditional probability, independence, counting techniques, binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions, statistics, and random walks. Prerequisites: MATH/CS 205 and MATH172. MATH 303 is recommended. Offered on demand.

317 Introduction to Algebraic Structures (3)
Introduces algebraic structures in modern algebra with particular emphasis on groups and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 307. Offered on demand.

323 Introduction to Real Analysis (3) (W)
A theoretical treatment of sets, relations, functions, numbers, inequalities, sequences, series, limits, and the derivative is developed in this course. Pre-requisite: MATH 303. Offered in the spring of odd-numbered years.

340 Modern Geometries (3)
Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries with an emphasis on the analytic method. The cultural impact of non-Euclidean geometries will be discussed. Topics include complex numbers, geometric transformations, plane geometries, including non-Euclidean geometries, the projective plane, quaterions, Hilbert’s axioms. Offered Fall of odd-numbered years.

350 Numerical Methods (3)
Examines efficient methods used in solving numerical problems with the aid of a computer. Topics include floating point arithmetic, interpolation and approximation, integration, roots of nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, and systems of linear equations. Prerequisites: MATH 172 and CS 112. MATH 307 is recommended. Offered on demand.

418 Advanced Algebraic Structures (3)
Continuation of MATH 317. Topics include groups, rings, fields, as well as Galois theory. Recommended for students who are planning to study mathematics at the graduate level. Prerequisite: MATH 317. Offered on demand.

424 Advanced Real Analysis (3)
Continuation of MATH 323. Topics include differentiation in RN, power series, the Riemann integral, compactness, and completeness. Recommended for students who are planning to study mathematics at the graduate level. Prerequisite: MATH 323. Offered on demand.

480 Advanced Seminar (3)
Enables students to explore areas of advanced mathematics which are otherwise not included in the curriculum. The specific content will vary each year and will be individually tailored to the interests of the students enrolled. Prerequisite: consent. Offered on demand.

489 Research in the Natural or Mathematical Sciences (3)
Provides students with the opportunity to conduct original research in an area of interest. Students will work closely with one or more members of the faculty to develop and conduct a research project. Students will present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. Students will be encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status and a major in mathematics, prior approval by the project advisor, and permission of the instructor. May be repeated once for a total of 6 hours of credit. Identical to BIO 489, CHEM 489, CS 489, and EES 489. Offered each semester.


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Last updated Aug. 28, 2007